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Is This an Egg Allergy?

Patient: Dear ask the doctor My girlfriend (26) used to be able to eat eggs and she can also eat egg-related foods (cakes, breads, etc). However, about a year or two ago she started throwing up eggs as soon as she eats them (fried, scrambled, etc.) she doesn’t have any of the other symptoms of an allergy like rashes or whatever so, does she have an egg allergy? and if so why (or how) did she come by it when she used to eat eggs before?

 

 

Doctor: If your girlfriend throws up immediately after consuming eggs and has no reaction whatsoever in response to other foods, it seems likely that she might have become allergic to egg proteins. This is quite rare,it may happen in some adults. There is no solid explanation to this reaction, but research indicates that certain factors like stress, either physical or psychological, can contribute to the sudden changes in the tolerance of some antigens in the body, and stress has been known to alter the normal microflora of the gut.In my opinion she should avoid eggs and egg products to prevent the allergic reactions like eczema, diarrhea, wheezing, coughing, angioedema and anaphylaxis – which is a medical emergency that needs immediate treatment. I recommend visiting her family doctor who may order an allergy test to confirm the possible allergen. Despite the fact that, as of now, she does not have any known severe allergic reactions to the egg antigen, she should to take all precautionary measures, and carry an epinephrin auto injection with her to help combat severe reactions that may appear at any time.If your girlfriend throws up immediately after consuming eggs and has no reaction whatsoever in response to other foods, it seems likely that she hasbecome allergic to egg proteins. This is quite rare, however it happens in some adults. There is no solid explanation to this reaction, and researchindicates that certain factors like stress, either physical or psychological, can contribute to the sudden changes in the tolerance of some antigens, andstress has already been known to alter the normal microflora of the gut.In my opinion she should avoid eggs and egg products to prevent the allergic reactions like eczema, diarrhea, wheezing, coughing, angioedema andanaphylaxis – which is a medical emergency that needs immediate treatment. I recommend visiting her family doctor who may order an allergy test toconfirm the possible allergen.Despite the fact that, as of now, she does not have any known severe allergic reactions to the egg antigen, she should to take all precautionary measures,and carry an epinephrin auto injection with her to help combat severe reactions that may appear at any time.

 


 

 
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Dr. Jimmy Obaji M.D.

Dr. Jimmy Obaji M.D.

Dr. Jimmy Obaji completed his residency in Family Medicine at the University of Manitoba. He currently operates a walk-in-clinic in downtown Toronto.

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