Ask The Doctor > Questions & Answers > Multiple Ostechondroma Exostoses in a young boy.

Multiple Ostechondroma Exostoses in a young boy.

Patient: My son has multiple osteochondroma exeostosis and has a difficult time getting up moving in the mornings i was hoping you might have some suggeustions to help with this..

 

 

Doctor: The multiple hereditary exostoses syndrome (MHE) s a genetic bone disorder in which benign cartilage-capped bone tumors s grow outward from the metaphyses of long bones, growth plates or from the surface of flat bones throughout the body. The severity of this disease varies widely.Some patients may have as few as two tumors, but most patients develop many more and the numbers of tumors can run into the hundreds. These Exostoses ( Osteochondromas) can cause many problems, including: compression of peripheral nerves or blood vessels; irritation of tendons and muscles resulting in pain and loss of motion; skeletal deformity; short stature; limb length discrepancy; chronic pain and fatigue; mobility issues; early onset arthritis; and an increased risk of developing malignant tumor transformation (chondro-sarcoma) reported risk of 2%-5% over life time. It is not uncommon for MHE patients to undergo numerous surgical procedures throughout their lives to remove painful or deforming Exostoses and or to correct limb length discrepancies and improve range of motion. Surgery, physical therapy and pain management are currently the only options available to MHE patients, but their success varies from patient to patient and many struggle with chronic pain, fatigue and mobility problems throughout their lives.

 


 

 
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Dr. Suneel Sharman M.D.

Dr. Suneel Sharman M.D.

Dr. Suneel Sharman completed his residency in Family Medicine at the University of Toronto. He currently operates Infinity Health Centre, a walk-in-clinic in downtown Toronto.

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