Pain in the calf that worsen with leg press


Q: Hi, I have had calf pain for the last 6-8 weeks, it started in my right calf muscle I think maybe after working out. I saw my family doctor and I then saw a physiotherapist, both thought it was a pulled muscle. I continued with treatment but it didn't go away too much, I then got a doppler ultrasound from my groin to my ankle, and it was clear. By the time the ultrasound was ordered my pain was getting a bit better. I continued with the physio and it got a good bit better, then last week I decided to try the leg press at the gym for the first time since stopping. Now one week on for the last 4-5 days my calf has been hurting but the pain is also radiating into my foot, shin and thigh. It is not tender to touch really, I don't think there is any swelling and I have no inherent risk factors for blood clotting. I am a 26 year old male around 150lbs and 5'9. What are the chances I could have a dvt?


A:   If you do not have risk factors for DVT and the Doppler came out normal, then it is not likely that you have a DVT at this present moment, on the other hand the pain is closely related with a physical activity, possibly keep hurting because you did not allow enough time to heal before. According to your description you may be experiencing a Calf Tendinitis. The calf muscle is made up of three muscles. The two heads of the gastrocnemius and the soleus, these three muscles end in a common tendon: the Achilles tendon. Usually the complaint is a sharp intense pain after a sudden or straining move. If you have a partial tear or complete rupture of the calf muscle then physical activity and weight-bearing will be impossible for 4-12 weeks depending on the injury. If you are suffering just from inflammation of the muscle then you can resume training after 7-10 days. Ineffective warm up and warm down routines can lead to calf strains. Calf strains can be caused by dehydration. Deficiencies in calcium, trace minerals and magnesium can also lead calf strains. Therefore I would recommend you to ensure adequate water intake and multi minerals. One of the most common causes is a condition called over pronation. Over pronation basically means that your feet are rolling over too much as you run or exercise which causes excessive pressure on the calf muscle and Achilles tendon.  Initial treatment should consist of ice packs. You can also use a wet towel that has been in the fridge or commercially available ice packs for focused pain relief. An anti-inflammatory medication such as Ibuprofen (“Motrin”, “Aleve”) will help you to reduce the swelling, this should be taken with meals and never before exercising .I recommend you complete rest for 5 days for a mild calf strain and then a gradual increase in training. Massaging the calf also helps to speed up recovery. View the calf Massager with four free rolling heads it’s particularly good at giving yourself a deep calf massage.

Related Q&A

Q: I am a 45 year old woman, otherwise in good health. Two months ago I noticed red marks above my toes and my foot turn...


Q: My daughter vomited about 30 minutes ago. Now she is complaining of chest pain however shes holding her side right be...

Q: 1st off, Is wearing a waist trainer while not working out effective? Second, is it safe?

Q: How long would Tylenol 3 w/codeine show on a drug test that tests to 2000 ng/ml? The dose was approx. 50mg of codeine...


Dr. James Obaji M.D.

  • 247 Reviews
  • Family Physician

Dr. Suneel Sharman M.D.

  • 190 Reviews
  • Family Physician

Dr. Pat Golden M.D.

  • 169 Reviews
  • Cardiologist

Dr. Kunaal Jindal M.D.

  • 112 Reviews
  • Plastic Surgeon