Our team ran a survey on Ask The Doctor's Official Instagram account with the question:

Do you feel comfortable getting the Covid-19 Vaccine?

The results where 80% saying yes and 20% saying no.

For those who answered no, we asked them on the next screen, what more information would they like to know?

A majority of the questions that came in were from pregnant women or women trying to conceive.

The Top 5 questions were:

  1. None of the clinical trials for major COVID-19 vaccines included pregnant people, why is this?
  2. Are women who are pregnant get impacted more by COVID-19?
  3. Should Pregnant women opt to take the vaccine?
  4. Should pregnant healthcare workers prioritize getting vaccinated?
  5. What if you’re not pregnant but are trying to conceive, should you get vaccinated?

We reached out to our network of Board-Certified Physicians to help us get their insight. As more Physicians continue to send us in their answers, we will continue to publish them below.

Dr. Purvi Parikh, M.D. FACP FACAAI

Dr. Parikh is a Board-Certified Immunologist and Allergist.

Q: None of the clinical trials for major COVID-19 vaccines included pregnant people, why is this?

A: Most clinical trials do not Include pregnant women because of risk mitigation strategies so this is not anything new. Also Institutional review boards scrutiny studies with pregnant women more due to risk to mom and baby both (more lives at stake instead of one). Since we are in a pandemic wanted to at least make sure safe in non pregnant first which is majority of population so we can start getting people protected And lower infection rates. By others getting vaccinated sooner indirectly will hopefully help pregnant women from being infected, will know more once we have transmission data.

Q: Are women who are pregnant get impacted more by COVID-19?

A: Yes, they have been deemed high risk for severe covid by the cdc

Q: Should Pregnant women opt to take the vaccine?

A: Yes if benefits of vaccine outweigh risks per discussion with their physician they should. There’s two lives at stake instead of one.

Q: Should pregnant healthcare workers prioritize getting vaccinated?

A: Yes healthcare workers are high risk especially those taking care of covid Patients and pregnancy puts them at risk for severe covid as well.

Q: What if you’re not pregnant but are trying to conceive, should you get vaccinated?

A: In my opinion it’s the best time, this way when you do get pregnant both you and baby are protected.


Dr. Yogita Tailor, DO

Dr. Tailor is a Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Specialist

Q: None of the clinical trials for major COVID-19 vaccines included pregnant people, why is this?

A: Pregnancy, technically, is a diagnosis with its own ICD10 coding. Multiple physiological changes occur during pregnancy which not only affect the reproductive system, but also cardiovascular, immunity, etc. It is not clear if this was a variable to exclude pregnant women in these trials or concern for adverse reactions which may effect the mother and the fetus. When taking into consideration the prevalence of pregnancy in the general population, as well as the prevalence of COVID, pregnant women should be considered for trials.

Q: Are women who are pregnant get impacted more by COVID-19?

A: Pregnant women who get COVID tend to be sicker than their non-pregnant counterparts with higher risk of ICU care, intubation, and death.

Q: Should Pregnant women opt to take the vaccine?

A: Strong discussion should be had with their Ob/Gyn, but in general, ACOG feels strongly that the vaccine should not be withheld from pregnant individuals as there is no live virus in the vaccine.

Q: Should pregnant healthcare workers prioritize getting vaccinated?

A: Pregnant women who have a higher risk for COVID exposure, such as in healthcare, should prioritize getting vaccinated.

Q: What if you’re not pregnant but are trying to conceive, should you get vaccinated?

A: YES.


Dr. Syeda Amna Husain, MD

Dr. Syeda Amna Husain is a board-certified concierge pediatrician providing quality pediatric care to children of all ages throughout Marlboro, NJ.

Q: None of the clinical trials for major COVID-19 vaccines included pregnant people, why is this?

A: Typically clinical trials begin with the healthiest individuals (specifically in phase 1 and phase 2) and when we move to phase 3 which are larger bodies of participants, we increase the diversity and presence of other health conditions (ie diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, etc), various age ranges, etcs. Still, we consider pregnant women and young children a vulnerable population and usually wait to study them in trials after we've completed initial phase 3 trials of non pregnant individuals.  That being said, pregnancy did end up occuring in a few of the phase 3 clinical trial participants and so far, they are being followed and no concerns yet.

Q: Are women who are pregnant get impacted more by COVID-19?

A: Absolutely. We know pregnant women who contract covid are at higher risks of hospitalization, intubation, ECMO, and even death.

Q: Should Pregnant women opt to take the vaccine?

A: This is a personal decision and one that needs to be made between the patient and their physician. At this time, the CDC, Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, and ACOG have all recommended that risks of contracting COVID are higher than theoretical risks related to the vaccine. If a pregnant woman is in a  high risk occupation such as being a health care worker, I think it's certainly something she should be offered and free to decide upon.

Q: Should pregnant healthcare workers prioritize getting vaccinated?

A: Again, this is a personal decision. I feel if pregnant women are being asked to take care of COVID positive patients, then they should also be given the right to be vaccinated, if they so desire.

Q: What if you’re not pregnant but are trying to conceive, should you get vaccinated?

A: This question was addressed by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine who do not recommend withholding the vaccine from patients who are planning to conceive, who are currently pregnant, or who are breastfeeding. Because COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are not composed of live virus, they are not thought to cause an increased risk of infertility, first or second trimester loss, stillbirth, or congenital anomalies.  Patients who conceive between dose 1 and 2  should still be offered the second dose at the appropriate interval.