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Torn Meniscus with intrarticular bodies

Patient: I have had a mri these are the findings: small joint effusion is present. Five or six small intraarticular bodies are present in the posterior aspect of the joint space, with the largest measuring 6mm in transverse dimension. The cruciate ligaments, collateral ligaments and quadriceps and patellar tendons are intact. A tear of the lateral meniscus is present. The tear involves the body and posterior harnsm, with relative sparing of the anterior horn. Severe lateral femorotibial hyaline cartilage loss is demonstrated. There is subchondral marrow edema in the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau as a result of full thickness carilage loss. In the medial compartment, no full thickness hyaline cartilage defects are visible and the meniscus in intact. Patellofemoral hyaline cartilage demonstrates thinning, but no full thickness defect. My question is if the torn meniscus is repaired will it releive the catching sensation, or my knee feeling like it is locking up?

 

 

Doctor: Meniscal injuries are a common problem in sports and in young active individuals; they arethe most frequent injury to th e knee joint. The menisci are C -shaped fibrocartilaginous structures attached to the tibia and their main functions to enhance the contact between the two articular surfaces of the knee: femur and tibia ones. The thick outline of menisci allows for a firm attachment to the joint capsule. According to your MRI, you have five or six small intraarticular bodies present in the posterior aspect of the joint space, with the largest measuring 6mm in transverse dimension. The cruciate ligaments, collateral ligaments and quadriceps and patellar tendons are intact. A tear of the lateral meniscus is present. The tear involves the body and posterior horn, with relative sparing of the anterior horn. The MRI is the most accurate imaging study to diagnose this kind of lesions. It is common the clicking, the locking and the pain in the affected knee.Spontaneous healing is common because of the rich blood supply in the meniscal periphery. Successful recovery from a meniscal tear is helped by a gradual resolution of symptoms over 6 weeks with a return to normal activity by 3 months. Many meniscal tears heal spontaneously. Also, can be treated with casting depending of the severity of the tear. With time the symptoms improve. If this does not happen, because you have intrarticular bodies in the joint space, then the surgical option may be considered, and definitely after surgery you will experience a significant improvement of all the symptoms.

 


 

 
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Dr. Jimmy Obaji M.D.

Dr. Jimmy Obaji M.D.

Dr. Jimmy Obaji completed his residency in Family Medicine at the University of Manitoba. He currently operates a walk-in-clinic in downtown Toronto.

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